ExoTheology & Space-Age Interpretations of the Bible

(religious implications of an inhabited universe)

resurrection and “the immense ‘radiation’ of G-dliness”

When the body will be resurrected in the times of Moshiach, the evil would have already been obliterated from this world through the immense “radiation” of G-dliness that will be revealed in this corporeal world.”

Would You Die To Live?
By Rabbi Gershon Avtzon, YLC, 6 Adar-I 5771 (10.02.2011)

While we have previously concluded that people from all previous generations will be resurrected in the future, we were left in the dark as to the fate of those still living when that G-dly time dawns upon the world.

Will all people living have to die and join the resurrection, or will they remain living, and witness the greatest phenomenon the world has ever seen.

At first glance, this question seems to be from left field. What logic could there be in requiring all living people to pass away? Why, while everyone else is coming back to life, would those who happen to be living have to expire before enjoying the utopia the Moshiach era promises?

To fully understand this concept, we need to have a discussion about the general concept of death. Why did Hashem “create” the concept of death?

The Torah (Parshas Bereishis) tells us that originally, Adam and Eve were supposed to live forever. It was only after they transgressed G-d’s will and ate for the “Tree of Knowledge” that mankind was deprived of eternal life.

Based on this narrative, death is understood as some form of punishment.

In Chassidic discourses (Sefer Maamarim Melukat Vol. 2 pg.277) death is reexamined, shedding a new light on this feared natural part of life. Death is really a blessing in disguise, they say.

To explain: Adam and Eve were created in a very pure state. There was evil in the world, represented by the sly serpent. But bad was not intertwined with holiness. When they ate, against G-d’s will, from the Tree of Knowledge, they brought evil into their lives and systems. To ensure that this evil shall not endure for eternity, G-d created death. With this ‘new invention,’ evil would eventually disappear.

When the body will be resurrected in the times of Moshiach, the evil would have already been obliterated from this world through the immense “radiation” of G-dliness that will be revealed in this corporeal world. [emphasis mine]

Equipped with this new perception of death, we can understand what would warrant the notion that all living people must die before joining the resurrected era. Indeed, the Zohar (vol.2 page 108b) writes that man will pass away when Moshiach comes.

Hearing this fact makes people very scared and wary of Moshiach’s arrival. Even if you know that you will be brought back to life moments later, the instinctive fear of death will overtake you.

Here, I will share the revolutionary approach of the Lubavitcher Rebbe (discourse entitled Bilah Hamaves 5725 footnote 36). There, he explains that there is one alternative to physical death; if one nullifies his evil and ego, as we say in our prayers (end of the “Shmone Esrei”) that “my soul is like dust to all…” With this type of “Bittul” we will be spared physical, albeit temporary, bereavement in the future.

Understanding the various aspects resurrection, we now need to proceed to clarify what blessings and sacrifices may be demanded of us upon our resurrection (or with the arrival of Moshiach without resurrection).

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